Monthly Archives: November 2011

A Mosque-Hammam-Khan Complex at Apollonia

The Roman road system is fairly well known. In the Balkans the most critical road that the Romans constructed was the Via Egnatia, which was built in the second century BC and named after Gnaeus Egnatius. It served as the … Continue reading

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Nation Building and Baths: A Comparison between the Finnish Sauna and Ottoman Hammam

Today I want to talk a bit about how the Finnish sauna and Ottoman hammam were used (and abused) in the course of nationalist programs in Finland in the 19th century and Turkey in the early twentieth century. By the … Continue reading

Posted in Baths and Bathing | 4 Comments

The Use of Ottoman Hammams in Greece Today

While visiting northern Greece my wife and I had the opportunity to visit several hammams, either on purpose or simply because we stumbled upon them. During the Ottoman period hammams were constructed in Greece’s major cities, just as they were … Continue reading

Posted in Baths and Bathing, Ottoman Greece | 3 Comments

The Sephardic Jews of Thessaloniki

For a majority of the Ottoman period Sephardic Jews constituted Salonika’s largest demographic. They arrived in the city in the later 15th century after their expulsion from Spain and quickly became a major economic and cultural force in the city. … Continue reading

Posted in Ladino Music, Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Jewish Population | 5 Comments

Ruminations on Thessaloniki and a Few Songs

My wife and I have just finished up our week long visit to Thessaloniki. The city is fantastic on a number of levels, and to my mind it’s a wonderful palimpsest—an ideal example of this blog’s inspiration. It comes at … Continue reading

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Mustafa Kemal’s House, Atatürk’s Monument

Yesterday I had the opportunity to take a tour of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk’s home here in Thessaloniki. For those that might not know, he’s the founder of the modern Turkish state and “kind of a big deal,” as they say. … Continue reading

Posted in Ataturk, Thessaloniki | 6 Comments